SIJ Load Transfer Efficiency

SIJ Load Transfer Efficiency

Course Outline

Movement Analysis and Motor Control Retraining for the Sacroiliac Joint and Pelvis. (2 days)

This informative practically orientated course focuses on the two main dysfunction types in the SIJ and pelvis – restrictive dysfunctions and stability dysfunctions. Motor Control issues are discussed from contemporary research literature and the SIJ biomechanics are explained with practical orientation. When there is failure of automatic locking of the sacroiliac joint to form a stable close pack position in weight bearing, pain can develop in the sacral sulcus and pelvic region. This may be due to a motor control deficit alone or in combination with restrictions. Participants will learn how to recognise a primary sacroiliac dysfunction or whether it is secondary to a lumbar spine or lower limb dysfunction. Pain can also develop in the SIJ due to hypermobility along one of its articular glides when the joint does not exhibit failure of automatic locking and load transfer. The participant will learn how to assess for these control deficits and restrictions in the SIJ complex. An evidence based clinical reasoning model will be applied to rehab involving manual therapy techniques and motor control retraining strategies. Participants are encouraged to bring appropriate clothing for practical sessions.

Course Outline


Motor Control Retraining for Failure of load transfer in the Sacroiliac Joint (1 day)

Failure of load transfer of the sacroiliac joint can present as acute disabling pain or persistent buttock pain in people of all ages. This informative practically orientated 1 day course focuses on stability dysfunctions and motor control retraining for the SIJ. Motor control issues are discussed from contemporary research literature and the SIJ biomechanics are explained with practical orientation. When there is failure of automatic locking of the sacroiliac joint to form a stable close pack position in weight bearing, pain can develop in the sacral sulcus and pelvic region. This form of joint instability may be due to lack of efficient muscle control in the deep  muscle stability system, or in combination with excessive muscle pull from superficial tight structures. Pain can also develop in the SIJ due to hypermobility along one of its articular glides in normal function when the joint is not exhibiting failure of load transfer. The participant will learn how to assess for these control deficits in the SIJ complex. An evidence based clinical reasoning model will be applied to rehab involving motor control retraining strategies for the deep and superficial muscle stability systems. Participants are encouraged to bring appropriate clothing for practical sessions.


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